Easy Grilled Chicken Wings

Thanks for requesting a complimentary consult for our private chef services.  We certainly hope that we will be able to find a cost-effective solution to help you free up more time to spend with your family and pursue your passions, all while letting you eat good food.

As promised, here is your bonus recipe. Chicken wings are an easy food to prep and cook, but also easy to overcook. Follow the steps below to get amazing wings, every time.

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Easy Grilled Chicken Wings
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Passive Time 8 hours
Servings
wings
Ingredients
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Passive Time 8 hours
Servings
wings
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Using a sharp knife, separate the wing flats from the drumsticks. You will be able to feel where the bones join; this is where you should insert the knife, and you should be able to slice through. Cut the wing tip off of the flat, and dispose of the tip.
  2. Put the wings in a large, non-reactive bowl, and toss with the sea salt. Add enough water to cover the wings. Cover and refrigerate for up to 8 hours.
  3. Remove the wings from the brine solution, and dispose of the brine. Pat the wings dry with a paper towel,
  4. Preheat your grill to high (500-600 degrees Fahrenheit).
  5. Toss the wings with the Saint Brian's Spice Rub until coated.
  6. Oil the grill grates. Place the wings on the grill, and cook for approximately 3-4 minutes. The wings will release easily from the grill when they are ready to flip. If you need to scrape under them with the spatula, then they aren't finished cooking on that side.
  7. Flip the wings once, and cook for another 3-4 minutes until cooked through. The meat will feel firm to the touch, and the internal temperature on an instant read thermometer will be 165 degrees.
  8. Allow to cool for a few minutes, and serve with Saint Brian's Barbecue Sauces for dipping.
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Why Not Both Sandwich: Pork, Poultry, and Pickled Slaw

Why limit your choice of meat to one, when you can have two?

Once again in the Acquisitions Intoxicated trend (you can catch this show on the Penny Arcade Twitch channel, Tuesdays at 3:00 pm EST), the Why Not Both Sandwich combines the forces of Cornish Game Hen with bratwurst, and tempers the savoriness with a quick pickled slaw. We promise to use this power for good, not evil.

The backstory: this week on Acquisitions Intoxicated, Jerry Holkins and Eric Benson brewed a Dunkel Weisse in honor of the character Jim Darkmagic. For those who haven’t followed their ongoing D&D game (hosted by Wizards of the Coast writer/project lead and dungeon master extraordinaire Chris Perkins), Jim (as played by Penny Arcade artist Mike Krahulik) has a penchant for flamboyancy, egoism, purple capes, and entering every room with a flourish of doves.

The Why Not Both Sandwich goes off of this by combining a lovely grilled bratwurst, Cornish game hen (because I couldn’t find any doves, and pigeons are hard to catch), and quick pickled slaw for some acidity to act as a counter note to the savoriness of this sandwich.

One last line of credit goes to the one, the only, the indomitable Jerry Holkins, aka Tycho Brahe, aka Omin Dran, for naming this bad boy.

 

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Why Not Both Sandwich: Pork, Poultry, and Pickled Slaw
Quick Pickled Slaw
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings
sandwich
Ingredients
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings
sandwich
Ingredients
Quick Pickled Slaw
Instructions
  1. Prepare the quick pickled slaw according to the recipe in the link above.
  2. Prepare the Cornish game hen according to the recipe in the link above. (OPTION: substitute the Cornish game hen with the salt-encrusted chicken recipe).
  3. When the game hen has completed cooking and is resting, cook the bratwurst, turning every couple of minutes to ensure even cooking, until the internal temperature reaches 160 degrees Fahrenheit.
  4. Cut the roll open, and toast.
  5. Cut the breasts off of the game hen (or use the Caveman Method). Alternative: carve the whole bird, and use a mixture of white and dark meat.
  6. Build the sandwich: put a layer of the slaw on one side of the toasted roll, and a layer of game hen on the other. Nestle the bratwurst in the middle. Devour.
    Quick Pickled Slaw
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Grilled Cornish Game Hen in 6 easy steps

6 steps to an awesome dish

Grilled Cornish game hen is a real crowd-pleaser. It may taste like chicken, but the presentation possibilities can really elevate a meal; imagine serving each of your guests their own bird, plated perfectly.  Cool, right?

This recipe is very simple, and uses Saint Brian’s BBQ Savory Saturday Spice Rub to really bring out the flavors without any overpowering heat; it’s definitely a crowd pleaser.

Quick tip: pay close attention to the internal temperature while cooking. These guys cook fast, and can dry out very quickly if they overcook.

As an added bonus, you can carve Cornish game hens the same way you would a full-sized chicken: caveman style.

Print Recipe
Grilled Cornish Game Hen
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Passive Time 10 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Passive Time 10 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Preheat your grill to high (500-600 degrees Fahrenheit) and set up for direct grilling.
  2. Using your hands, combine the butter and spice rub in a bowl until combined.
  3. With your finger, gently separate the skin from the meat along the breasts and legs, taking care not to break the skin.
  4. Take half of the butter and spice mixture and form into a ball. Place the ball under the skin. Holding the opened end of the skin down so that the butter doesn't come back out, use the skin to push the butter over the breasts and legs. Rub the remainder of the butter on the inside of the cavity.
  5. Place the game hen on the grill, and cook with the lid down for about 20 minutes. It's best to use a thermometer probe to monitor the internal temperature, as these birds cook fast. Cook until the internal temp on the breasts is 165 degrees.
  6. Remove from the heat, and allow to rest for 10 minutes.
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Quick Pickled Slaw

With the savory flavors of grilling and barbecue often being the primary, and sometimes overpowering, flavor note, having something on the acidic side, such as this quick pickled slaw, can cut the richness with a counterpoint that enhances the flavor. It seems counter-intuitive, I know, but having a balance of flavors highlights the flavor notes on all sides, and keeps the food from becoming overwhelming.

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Quick Pickled Slaw
Quick Pickled Slaw
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Passive Time 30 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Passive Time 30 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Quick Pickled Slaw
Instructions
  1. Add the cider vinegar, bay leaves, peppercorns, salt, and sugar to a pot and bring to a boil. Make sure that the sugar and salt are completely dissolved.
  2. Strain the vinegar into a glass or non-reactive bowl. Discard the peppercorns and bay leaves.
  3. Add the shredded cabbage and jalapeno slices to the vinegar. Cover, and allow to steep for 30 minutes.
To Preserve
  1. Stuff sterilized mason jars with the cabbage and jalapenos, and fill with the vinegar. Seal tightly, and refrigerate.
Recipe Notes

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War Hammer Burger

Warning: this burger is not for the faint of heart. It requires commitment. It requires a steady hand. It requires gastronomic fortitude.  Are you worthy?

The genesis of this burger came from watching Acquisitions Intoxicated on the Penny Arcade Twitch channel. They are brewing a different D&D-themed beer each week, based on the characters of a long-running D&D game the Penny Arcade crew (with other such luminaries as Wil Wheaton, Patrick Rothfuss, and Morgan Webb) has been playing in conjunction with Wizards of the Coast, and run by Chris Perkins.

This week, they brewed a black IPA called WarPriest. When I asked what food would pair well with the finished product, they said a burger, and “meat”. The result is the War Hammer: beef, chorizo, prosciutto, bacon, and a fried egg with Zombie Punch Sauce (cause a cleric’s burger should be able to turn the undead).

I’ll be honest, I got the meat sweats while eating it. I’ve decided that this is a “sometimes” burger.

See my question and Eric’s answer for pairings at the 35:25 minute mark below. Adult language.

Watch live video from PennyArcade on www.twitch.tv

 

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War Hammer Burger
war-hammer-burger
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
burger
Ingredients
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
burger
Ingredients
war-hammer-burger
Instructions
  1. Preheat your grill to high.
  2. Mix the beef, chorizo, and Dash Cunning Spice Rub in a bowl with your fingers. Form into a patty about 1 inch thick, and use your thumbs to put a divot in the middle of the top.
  3. Add the bacon to a cold skillet, and place over medium/medium-high heat. Cook until crispy; keep the rendered bacon fat in the pan
  4. Put your burger on the grill. Turn after 4 minutes. Remove from the grill after another 3 minutes, or once desired doneness has been reached. Quickly toast your bun on the hot grill.
  5. Start building the burger: patty, Zombie Punch BBQ Sauce, prosciutto, bacon.
  6. Heat the bacon fat over medium heat, and crack the egg into the pan, taking care not to break the yolk. Fry for about 1 minute until the egg white and yolk are set, then place on top of the burger.
  7. Sprinkle the Parmesan cheese on top, and then dig in.
    war-hammer-burger
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How to Marinate or Brine: Wet and Dry Methods

how to marinate meatProperly preparing food prior to it going into a smoker or on the grill is of the utmost importance. There are many methods, but at the core is either brining or marinating before applying heat. This not only imparts flavor, it also ensures that your food doesn’t dry out over the course of a long time in the dry heat of a smoker. Properly marinating or brining your meat before cooking is the difference between dry, tough meat, and melt-in-your-mouth, fall-apart meat.

How does it work? While scientists do not have a consensus for what the exact chemical reaction is, the gist of it is that by using one of these methods that salt gets drawn into the food and help trap water, as salt is hydrophilic.

So, what are the options?

On the wet side of things:

  1. Brining: This is the process of soaking your food in a solution of water and salt (I prefer to use sea salt, but really any salt will work). You will need a vessel large enough to contain your food and enough water to submerge it. Generally, I use a ratio  of 1 cup of salt for every half gallon of water, but you can adjust this based on your taste. The upside to this method is that it is super easy (and relatively inexpensive). The downside is that you need to have a larger vessel for larger items, such as turkeys or pork shoulder, and you need to find room in the fridge if you intend to brine it for more than 30 minutes. Larger cuts should brine for longer, so this can be problematic. A bucket full of water and meat can also be very heavy.
  2. Marinating: The same process as brining, only using other flavors as well. This can be as simple as buying a bottle of marinade off the shelf, or making one of your own; either are valid options.  Get your food coated in the marinade, allow to soak for at least 30 minutes (again, larger cuts of meat will take longer). This could be a good use for one of the Saint Brian’s BBQ sauces; a friend of mine soaks beef roasts in Sweet Victory prior to slow cooking them. The result: a super-flavorful dish that melts in your mouth.

In either case, make sure to rise off any excess liquid before cooking so that the food isn’t over seasoned, and in the case of a marinade to get the sugars off so that they don’t burn. Also, discard any of the liquid remaining after you take the meat out, as it is not safe for consumption.

On the dry side:

  1. Dry Brine: coat the entire outer surface of the meat with kosher or sea salt. And I mean cover it. Not a light sprinkling. Wrap it in plastic wrap or seal it in a resealable plastic bag, and allow it to sit overnight. This will perform the same function as a wet brine, only without the need of a bucket and water. It’s a space saver. Be sure to brush off the excess salt (or even rinse it lightly) to prevent the food from tasting too salty when you cook it. A variation on this is the Salt Roasted Chicken recipe we just posted the other week.
  2. Dry Rub: a staple of the barbecue community. Every pitmaster has his or her own secret blend of spices (I’m partial to Dash Cunning Rub myself) that they slather onto the meat for a few hours before cooking. My personal preference is to leave it on when I throw ribs or pork shoulder into the smoker; it forms an amazing, flavorful crust over the hours it spends smoking.  Why does this work with a rub, as opposed to a dry brine? Less salt over all.

Check out our videos on rib prep for an example of how to use a dry rub.